Adams County’s treasurer sued over gaps in election records

Secretary of State Douglas F. Renacci was not the only one to draw ire this week for omissions and errors in the state’s election books. Adams County filed a lawsuit this week seeking to…

Adams County’s treasurer sued over gaps in election records

Secretary of State Douglas F. Renacci was not the only one to draw ire this week for omissions and errors in the state’s election books. Adams County filed a lawsuit this week seeking to have Treasurer Robert Ulrich declared incompetent and the county asserting that many of the county’s voting records are not truthful or in compliance with state election laws.

Through a telephone call, Adams County spokesman Daniel Krieg declined to say how many registered voters were missing or how many ballots were short or late because of not properly responding to a request for voter registration.

According to the election statement of amount for Adams County, Larisa Steinbach of Adams had qualified as a voter, but, when she received her ballot, she told her son that she hadn’t qualified because she had a disability and could not cast a ballot. Instead, her son filled out a supplemental form that stated her address in the Columbus suburb of Westerville, Ohio. When her son took the ballot to her house, his mother later told him the ballot never made it. Instead, he returned the ballot to a place that did not exist, where it was given to an out-of-state friend of the family for them to keep.

Adams County hired an independent auditor, Touhy & Co., who issued a report that said the county’s treasurer was in financial distress, and that at least one financial officer had gone “on the gold licorice diet” and that the county spent money like it was their “last.”

“Armed with iron will, and a penchant for ‘doubling up’ several times, the county treasurer appears to have engaged in much spending, and little recovering,” the report stated.

John C. Barker, an attorney with Wilcox Young, who is representing Adams County, declined to comment, as did Fran Cole, a spokesman for the Ohio Department of State. Mr. Renacci’s office also declined to comment.

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