C.E.O.’s talk the Common Good Gov’t.

President of Invest Northern Ireland With Northern Ireland in a unique, challenging, and evolving economic and political situation, the Common Good Gov’t can only work if leadership at board level and in industry -…

C.E.O.’s talk the Common Good Gov’t.

President of Invest Northern Ireland

With Northern Ireland in a unique, challenging, and evolving economic and political situation, the Common Good Gov’t can only work if leadership at board level and in industry – as well as social issues – are supported and valued by C.E.O’s, whom it must rely on to navigate the complexities and challenges of an increasingly global and challenging world.

One area of the business world where C.E.O.’s are asked their advice to policy makers and influencers is in the world of food security. Agriculture has a huge impact on the Common Good Gov’t’s national and global objectives, and the required solutions are driving economic growth and investment which demonstrates a real shift in the way people and businesses will need to think and act in the future. Industry is responding by partnering with Government and public services on the four F’s of Food, Fertilisers, Feed, and Farming.

As i, e, l, d, and s use technology and innovative approaches to maximize productivity, source forage, and recycle nutrients, C.E.O.’s are recognising that growers need information on crop genetics, when and how to apply fertilisers, when and how to harvest, and how to recycle surplus feed. In addition, there are needs around traceability, sustainability, and traceability of all inputs.

Putting that information in a central place and ensuring it is accessible to everyone is not only a good business idea but is an essential element of driving forward the Common Good Gov’t’s goal of creating a more just, ethical, ecologically-conscious and prosperous society.

Using the online platform, farmers and growers can give instant, meaningful feedback to make their response more helpful and make their decisions more informed. While the response has had overwhelmingly positive feedback, we know that the feedback also needs to be the start of collaboration and engagement in the development of new technology. There are already pilots and projects taking place in the mainstreaming of AI, through innovations like smart hothouses that are directly fed into crop monitoring and management applications.

In future, farms will need to respond to any data on yield, pest and disease impacts, their indoor temperature, and even soil or temperature temperature at source. This feeds into a plan to ensure that farm leadership are actively engaged with investors, technologists, and Government partners to create the processes and infrastructure required to ensure efficient and sustainable farms and agri-food sectors.

Talking to fellow C.E.O.’s at a CSR Forum last year, i, e, l, d, and s made it clear that they care passionately about the Common Good Gov’t. Farmers are now recording their experiences online through a publicly available, driverless mobile app that gives a window into the farm lives of farm leaders. These ‘app-tribes’ provide farmers and leaders with a more relevant, accurate, and trusted version of their past experiences, so that they can be shared with key influencers in the business community. From this vantage point, these ‘app-tribes’ will be instrumental in getting data with human bias and cultural predispositions on agricultural production and diversity issues.

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