Casino companies are hiring women to fill top managerial positions, but will that help?

The U.S. casino industry has come under fire in recent years for its largely all-male hierarchy and wage gap. Some male-dominated casino jobs remain very well paid and lucrative in terms of compensation, but…

Casino companies are hiring women to fill top managerial positions, but will that help?

The U.S. casino industry has come under fire in recent years for its largely all-male hierarchy and wage gap. Some male-dominated casino jobs remain very well paid and lucrative in terms of compensation, but women often fare poorly in both spheres. One of the biggest concerns is the role of management positions — not just in good pay, but also in building positive and inclusive cultures in a women-oriented workplace. The percentage of female board of directors members for the industry in 2015 was only 5.9 percent, or at 3,111 boards out of 6,958 total, according to a 2016 report from Catalyst, a nonprofit organization that works to increase gender diversity in business.

In an effort to close that gender disparity and increase parity among casino-specific promotions, the National Coalition for Responsible Gaming, the World Gaming Institute and the Marketing Research Foundation held a conference in Las Vegas at the end of 2017. At the conference, they called for companies to consider hiring a female corporate recruiting officer to fill a number of positions that are currently closed to women. Over the past year, the coalition has published several posts about the new policy that their group deems to be a first for the gaming industry. These positions are primarily in top-tier management positions in companies like venues and slot machines manufacturers.

The group sent letters to more than 450 casinos with positions for executive talent — and 30 of those 30 companies selected a female recruitment officer, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. But these positions are by no means a panacea for the gender disparity in compensation and promotions in the industry. According to a report by the National Center for Women & Information Technology, the median annual compensation for a gaming veteran is about $80,000 less than it is for a US consumer electronics sales professional, and salaries are relatively low compared to other traditional employee groups.

In order to meet its goals of addressing the gender gap in employment in gaming, the coalition has also created a new non-profit initiative that hopes to help support and educate the sector’s policymakers and women in the industry.

Read the full story at Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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