Overdiagnosis and Overmedication

Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular disease, one of the main causes of death worldwide, is a condition involving blood flow to the heart and brain. Symptoms include: shortness of breath, chest pain, loss of consciousness, and…

Overdiagnosis and Overmedication

Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular disease, one of the main causes of death worldwide, is a condition involving blood flow to the heart and brain. Symptoms include: shortness of breath, chest pain, loss of consciousness, and dizziness. They can be associated with heart attack and kidney damage.

Generic names for CV are: heart failure, coronary artery disease, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, angina / apophysitis/ angina pectoris, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, coronary artery calcium, and atherosclerosis.

There are a number of drugs approved in the US that help prevent or treat CV. These include diltiazem, entecavir, and its generic forms, emendal, and propranolol. Celebrex, fluoxetine, gabapentin, levothyroxine, riluzole, and thioridazine are also used to treat CV.

Taken over the long term, they can prevent organ damage and death and, when used with exercise and a healthy diet, they may improve exercise tolerance and also help in the fight against metabolic syndrome (AIS).

Many people may have CVD despite their best intentions. They should try to be aware of their risk factors – for example, poor weight and smoking – and get the help they need to lower their risk. Also, if one is diagnosed with a CVD, they should be aware of how many people are dying from the disease.

Doctors typically recommend a course of 3 cholesterol-lowering drugs in addition to other treatments. One of these drugs, rosuvastatin (Lipitor), is also the first in the new class of statins, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol drugs. Another class of drugs to treat CV include valsartan, which is also the first.

Important Gains, Low Savings

These drugs have several important benefits. They help lower LDL cholesterol. LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, is known as the “bad” cholesterol. High levels of bad cholesterol have been linked to increase in serious medical conditions. Having a low level of good cholesterol is not good either. High levels of LDL are associated with heart disease, heart attack, and heart failure.

There are also possible side effects that must be discussed with the patient before taking a statin or HDL drug. These side effects include:

bone loss and problems with the body’s immune system

increased blood pressure

shortness of breath

face ulcers

insomnia

skin rashes and skin cancer

hair loss

constipation

loss of appetite

unsightly discoloration of skin and bruising

seizures

miscarriage or stillbirth

The SOP includes the following guidance on which drugs should be considered for each person’s particular risk profile.

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